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Tag Archives: Waste management

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With My Waste Free Home – making your home as waste free as you want it to be – I have to watch what I purchase seeing as I no longer have a waste company collecting my trash. I usually shop in Tesco as it is the closest store to me and sells all my favourite brands such as Ecover & Glenesk, and their fish counter is pretty good. Well, this has all changed as when I am now shopping I look at the Recycling Labels on EVERYTHING I put in my basket. I need to know this information to be one step ahead and know where I will be putting the end of life packaging. Well Tesco are crap at giving me the information I need to be able to dispose of packaging correctly – their own products have little or no information and to be honest majority of big brands just don’t include this information either!

With My Waste Free Home – if you choose to reduce your waste bills by up to 90% and share a communal waste bin with your neighbours and recycle and compost the majority of your waste. The web site will give you all the information you will need and even a list of products – what they are made from and how to recycle them. I will also be giving information emails that you can copy and paste and will help put pressure on retailers and companies to 1. Label Correctly to ensure packaging is recycled where it can be and 2. If the packaging is just too over the top you can let the company know you feel this way and 3. Why they are not using packaging that CAN BE recycled????

I know it will shake up a lot of things in Ireland and hopefully pave the way for a more logical waste solution that gives people a greater choice. I am finding I have changed my shopping habits greatly buying more fruit and veg locally to reduce the dreaded non recyclable packaging. Shifted totally away from Tesco as I read all about their clubcard and didn’t like what I read…You can read my findings here. I just pop in for the few bits that I need there and pop quickly back out again. I am loving my local Lidl as their products have clear recycling labels and this gives me the understanding that yes as a whole, their company is much more involved in sustainability – their stores are smaller – they have a more European feel to them and I like that.

My Waste Free Home is still being implemented in my home and I am getting the whole concept together with the relevant bodies behind it – then the big launch will happen – in the mean time if you want any information be sure and email me claire@clairelewis.ie 🙂


myfh1

Yes, it is finally here and I am finally set up to manage my own house-hold waste myself, on site and actually saving money in the process! Getting the house waste free organised and ready was tough and I still have lots to do, but as I said at the beginning this is a lifestyle and my whole house will need to row in behind me. Now I do have a very small tin trash can with a biodegradable (Earth Rated Dog Poop) bag – as the liner, just incase my family or visitors bring me some items that I have not planned for or cannot recycle!

TrashedTo celebrate the start of this exciting venture for me and hopefully others will follow – saving tones of waste from landfill, I have a copy of  ‘TRASHED’  the amazing film starring Jeremy Irons, to give away to one lucky winner.

All you have to do to be in with a chance to win is:

Go to My Waste Free Home’s Facebook page and LIKE it.

If you don’t care for Facebook then please leave me a message or email me at claire@clairelewis.ie.

Be sure and keep checking my blog to find out all about my trials and tribulations, how much I am saving, the benefits of taking on a challenge like this to all of your family – bringing OUR waste problem HOME where we can show our children and others that we CAN do something positive to make a difference.

 


toothbrush

When thinking of everyday objects that are necessities you would wonder how much involvement do the manufacturers have in the quest to rid the world of non recyclable, useless, badly designed items?

For me the TOOTHBRUSH pops into mind when thinking of such an item. Like soothers these items are on a whole 100% recyclable but main stream recycling companies will not accept them as they are deemed hard to recycle waste and end up in landfill. A toothbrush is made up of 5 different types of plastics all of which can be recycled.

I have heard that you can send your toothbrush back to the company you bought it from to be recycled but when I googled this it seems to me this can only happen in the states. A company called Preserve makes toothbrushes from yogurt pots and then when the tooth brush is used up you post it back and it is ground down into park benches and the likes.

TerraCycle who are global leaders in recycling hard to recycle waste items do have a collection programme with Colgate called the Colgate Oral Care Brigade  check it out in your county to see if TerraCycle offer this and get collecting.

Do the math: Thats 4 tooth brushes a year per person and we are now living to an average age of 67.2  = thats 268.8 toothbrushes per person.

And with 7 billion of us on the plannet that leaves a heck of a lot of tooth brushes going to land fill.

Useful links:

http://environment.about.com/od/earthtalkcolumns/a/toothbrush.htm

http://www.greenamerica.org/pubs/greenamerican/articles/21Things.cfm

http://www.preserveproducts.com/

http://www.examiner.com/article/recycle-your-expired-toothbrush


trash canOk, so I am going to get you to do a pop quiz about your trash can/bin and I want you to let me know genuinely how many you got right.

  1. What company do you use to collect your waste?
  2. How much do you pay them per month or per lift?
  3. Where do they bring YOUR recycling waste?
  4. Where do they bring YOUR trash can/bin waste?
  5. How much information is available on the company website to explain what happens to YOUR trash/recycling/compost?
  6. Do you know where the company processes the recycling and what countries are the main buyers of recycling waste?
  7. Do you know what all of the recycling symbols mean?
  8. Do you worry about the amount of rubbish you produce?
  9. Do you know what local authority/ government recycling amenities are available in your area?
  10. Would you like to reduce your waste or even better still have a waste FREE home?

There is a method to my madness with these questions. I want to start something to make people more aware of their own bin life cycle that everything we purchase will end up in the trash but this is not a good thing mind. Companies are producing products containing massive amounts of plastic, that not only costs a lot of energy, Co2, Dioxins, to produce & to transport, for a throw away society that has no connection with where it actually goes?

If you could let me know how you get on with these questions pretty please it would help 🙂


angkor rubbish dumps

LESS is most definitely MORE……..

What does this mean – let me tell you. Waste is a relatively new term and problem born from a massive surge in consumption and the production of man-made products that nature just cannot deal with. Nature does not produce waste we do! Our increasing, detrimental, over consumption, need, and want of Stuff & Things. In my opinion landfills and other ways of dealing with waste is a ticking time bomb waiting to explode and cause unknown environmental problems. Does anyone really care what happens to the contents of their weekly trash? Where does it go when we throw it OUT, where is OUT?

Ask some one over 60 what they did with their waste?

They more than likely did not have much waste for a number of reasons mostly because they were not living in an era of massive consumption. They did not have corporations and companies paying megga bucks to market products and drive consumer spending even if the consumer didn’t really need the product. Services such as tailors, shoe makers, seamstress were the norm. The quality of products was greater as the material was made by hand and was made to last. They didn’t over spend in super markets as they bought daily what they needed in the local community or had home grown veg and hens maybe?

If their shoe needed a mend they did not toss them OUT they got them mended. These days we can replace a shoe cheaper than mending it. Consumers have driven this trend and in turn created a monster in Waste. We all need to scale back and try to think that Less is More. The ironic thing is we are all better off with Less.

Mentally,  Financially and Environmentally LESS is MORE.

Stay tumed for little ways to change your daily routine and embrace the LESS is MORE Movement

Join in the movement and I would love to know your thoughts #lessismore #clairelewis